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Congratulations to the 2017 StandOUT Award Recipients

by Vancouver Pride Society

The six awards from the 2017 StandOUT Awards ceremony. Each award is a different colour of the Pride Rainbow Flag, with the awards lined up to make the rainbow.
The six awards from the 2017 StandOUT Awards ceremony. Each award is a different colour of the Pride Rainbow Flag, with the awards lined up to make the rainbow.  

On June 22, the Vancouver Pride Society held the StandOUT Awards. The StandOUT Awards, formerly the Legacy Awards, was an evening to acknowledge and celebrate the work done within the LGBTQ2+ community. As well, the Awards are an opportunity to celebrate some of the many people who work and advocate within and for the community.

There were six award categories this year. The Vancouver Pride Society awarded five recipients six awards in the categories of: Business Leader, Educator, Social Activist, Friend of the Environment, Youth, and the Kimberly Nixon Trans, Two-Spirit, Gender Non-conforming Contribution to Community Award. Nominations were open to anyone in the community, with all the nominations reviewed by the selection panel. All five award recipients were chosen by a panel of volunteer community members.

Business Leader:
Niis Miou (or Travis Angus) is the recipient of the Business Leader Award. Travis advocates for the acceptance of LGBTQ2+ and Two-Spirit communities. He has promoted safety for these groups in the business, recovery, health, politics, health care, hairdressing, culinary and education fields. Travis also works to promote the understanding of his culture by providing blessings, prayers, openings and teachings to others through his work with the Greater Vancouver Native Cultural Society .

Educator:
Idris Hudson is the recipient of the Educator Award. Idris is a dedicated Compassion Advocate and Group Facilitator. In the past five years, Idris began sharing his own personal experiences with homelessness, addiction and sexual exploitation with the LGBTQ2+ community through a series of workshops and private speaking engagements. In 2015, Idris delivered his first keynote TEDx Talk Consciousness Is Irreversible, and served on the 2016 Senior Board of Advisors for the TEDxSFU Organizing Committee.

Social Activist:
Danny Ramadan is the recipient of the Social Activist Award. Danny found his calling in activism, civil society, journalism and creative writing. He has been involved in coordinating efforts and raising over $80,000 to support queer and trans refugees from Syria to immigrate to Canada, which he has his new home as well. To celebrate his activism, he was a Grand Marshal in the 2016 Vancouver Pride Parade. Danny is also a public speaker and storyteller, featured in the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia Breakfast, National Liberal Convention 2016, and TEDxSFU 2016.

Friend of the Environment:
Jacquoline Martin is the recipient of the Green-Friend Of The Environment Award. Jacquoline is a twenty-six-year-old award winning, disabled entrepreneur from Waterloo, Ontario. Jacquoline uses her epilepsy and lived experience as fuel to advocate for various vulnerable groups across Canada. Jacquoline is the founder of Vancouver Outreach: a bi-weekly distribution program to the less-fortunate that reside in the eastern core of Vancouver. The primary focus of the program is to educate youth on stereotypes surrounding homelessness, while empowering students to get in engaged in community activities. The secondary goal is to address carbon emissions generated by food waste. Jacquoline has partnered with Refood Rescue Foundation which helps redistribute food to help combat the rising methane levels being generated by discarded excess goods. Jacquoline is the CEO and founder of SORA, North America's first charitable subscription box.

Youth Award as well as the Kimberly Nixon Trans, Two-Spirit, Gender Non-Conforming Contribution to Community Award:
Cormac O'Dwyer is the recipient of both the Youth Award and Kimberly Nixon Trans, Two-Spirit, Gender Non-Conforming Contribution to Community Award. Cormac came out as trans when he was thirteen, and his experiences of transitioning in school were used to develop the updated Vancouver School Board SOGI Policy (which passed in 2014 despite hateful opposition). Over the past ten years he has been heavily involved in advocacy for LGBTQ2+ rights in policy-making and educational settings, as well as in television, newspaper, and radio.

His recent work includes advising the Ministry of Health on the development of a program to repair the deficit and discrimination of trans and gender variant folks in healthcare. He is also involved in coordinating and facilitating the First and Second Annual Diverse Sexual Orientations and Gender Identities Conference, and presents lectures on gender diversity in schools across the Lower Mainland.

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